business people lying on floor in circle

Sodexho says these are the top FM trends to watch for

Due to technological advances and the need to create more sustainable lifestyles, FM teams are generating improved personal and work environments. Safer and smarter environments are being developed by looking at people’s needs and fully understanding those needs.

From technology to recruitment, here are the top FM trends to watch out for:

• Augmented reality glasses are next level tech. Technicians and engineers from various industries are using augmented reality glasses in many ways, including communication, live video and for information and problem-solving.

• Chatbots are becoming more and more popular in the modern workplace. Automating the chat function on your company website is becoming the norm as chatbots can offer 24/7 support to your clients. Using artificial intelligence to answer your customer queries is the next step in offering around the clock support. Chatbots learn as they go, building a catalogue of expanding data and knowledge.

• Ultraviolet lights at certain wavelengths are fighting bacteria, viruses and other harmful microorganisms. Killing mould and bacteria could reduce issues faced by schools, hospitals, nursing homes and other public establishments. When bacteria is exposed to UV light, it is unable to spread or infect.

• Attracting the best talent in facilities management is proving to be an uphill battle. A limited number of young people are going down the FM route, leaving a shortage of skilled workers seeking blue-collar roles. More could be done to introduce apprenticeships to school leavers and perhaps graduate programs could be considered for those completing university degrees.

• Retaining talent is a challenge in many industries. Consulting and engaging with staff are great ways to make your employees feel listened to and valued. Goal setting and assisting your staff in achieving their goals is a key principle in retaining staff. They can then work towards progression in the industry and will appreciate loyalty and investment from their employer. Treating employees well will guarantee good employee reviews which, in turn, will attract the very best talent in your industry.

• Remote monitoring from a 24/7 call centre, 365 days a year will save your clients valuable time and money. System failures, alarm responses and general issues can be dealt with and resolved remotely, without the need for an engineer or technician to visit the client’s sites.

• Building analytics is an innovative FM trend. Systems are customisable and can monitor building control equipment. They can also collect data on output and energy savings, as well as performance.

• Green buildings, also known as living buildings, are growing in popularity. Living buildings are generating their own energy using solar panels, wind energy and other renewable energy. Many occupants of living buildings grow their own produce and operate a swap and share scheme.

• Waste-free buildings produce their own energy and generate minimal waste. The buildings and occupants work together with facilities management teams to achieve sustainable living.

• Wellbeing buildings are the trend of the moment in FM circles. Everything from the paints, carpets and furnishings are ergonomically designed for the benefit of the building’s occupants.


Signs that you're ready for a new job

Signs that you're ready for a new job

How is it that on the weekends, you can wake up naturally at the crack of dawn, shower, get the kids ready and be all packed up in the car ready for a fun family day out? Yet by Monday morning, you’re hitting that snooze button harder than a cricketer hitting a six.

If this resonates with you, it could be time to consider your next career move. Feeling unenthusiastic and down about work is one of the first signs that you’re unhappy and ready to burn out.

It could be possible to relight the excitement you felt when you first started your job. If you’ve allowed your disappointments to mount up, you could try to tackle some of the issues you’re facing and make positive changes. Conversely, you may have learned from previous jobs that you’ve already gone too far down the road to turn back.

Either way, here are some things to consider before you update your CV and start to circulate it amongst your favorite recruitment agencies:

Signs that you’re ready for a new job:

• As you’re setting your alarm in the evenings, you get that overwhelming feeling of dread. When the morning comes, you are not motivated to get out of bed and find yourself pressing snooze as many times as you feel you can get away with.

• Both leaving the house early and arriving home late are getting in the way of much-valued family time. Your work commitments are beginning to have a negative impact on your social life and on relationships with friends and family.

• You’re fed up of the commute. Sitting in traffic for long periods of time at both sides of the day is making you resent your job.

• Your workload is expanding and you’re feeling overloaded. You’ve been given more responsibility, but you have not been given the financial compensation that should come with it.

• You no longer feel challenged and you’re bored. The long working day is becoming a drag.

• Your impeccable sickness record is suffering, and your level of absenteeism is increasing. You’re feeling stressed which is causing health issues.

• Your manager lacks motivation and support which is letting the team down. You feel they won’t be going anywhere fast and have concerns about personal progression.

• The company isn’t moving with the times which is affecting sales; you’d prefer to work with a forward-thinking company and a more innovative team.

• You feel that opportunities to grow both personally and within the company are limited.

• You don’t feel like you fit in with the company culture and want to work somewhere with like-minded people who have the same objectives as you.

• You receive your first negative appraisal, which could indicate your dissatisfaction and lack of enthusiasm at work is not going unnoticed.

If you can relate to one or more of the above, you may be ready for a new challenge where you can set goals and push yourself to reach them. Now could be the perfect time to grab a new opportunity with both hands and get that spring back into your step.


Hiking walk

Catch 22’s 12th Charity Walk Challenge

Catch 22’s 12th Charity Challenge is next week!
 
We started these walks in 1997 and this year we are taking on The #SouthDownsWay!
 
This year the #walk will take place on Wednesday, May 1st – Saturday 5th. Vince and Simon (with Don’s organisational assistance!) are tackling the 100 miles from #Winchester to #Eastbourne. Simon will make it, although Vince is not sure his metal knee will last all the way. But 50 odd intrepid walkers will ensure fun is had and money raised.
 
(It's not too late to join us, although you need to sort out your own travel and accommodation. One night in Winchester, #Petersfield, and #Midhurst followed by three in #Brighton, ending with a big celebration in the Good Companions in #Brighton on Sunday night.
 
If you would like to sponsor us, head to our Just Giving page - https://bit.ly/2Uzm7xy
 
As always the main charity is the @Lords Taverners
Simon is walking for Burning Nights CPRS charity; you can read more about CPRS and donate here - https://bit.ly/2vmGrrC
 
Thanks very much in advance!

office and computers

The link between good office design and productivity

Open plan is the design of choice for many facilities management companies, but new studies have shown that these large open spaces can have a negative impact on productivity.

Those workers whose roles require a quiet environment can be disrupted, which results in an output decrease. The study also shows an increase in absenteeism and a costly high turnover of staff. So what makes a good office design and happy and productive staff?

Here are 7 things to consider:

Ask your employees
Your employees know best, so involve your staff in design decisions. Once you learn more about how they work and how they think, they could work smarter, and improvements can be made to encourage maximum output from the whole team

Little things can go a long way
Whilst your staff may dream of bean bag seating and games consoles aplenty, this is not a suitable workspace for most businesses. There are some small luxuries you can offer, however, that will make your staff feel listened to and appreciated, as well as improving their experience at work:

-       Childcare services
-       Vending machines
-       Subsidised canteen
-       Doctor / Dentist clinics
-       Green / Outdoor areas
-       Games rooms
-       Communal couch areas
-       Massage chairs
-       Dress down Friday
-       Bring your dogs/kids to work day

Renew your tech
Use software to automate systems, freeing up more time for staff to do more productive jobs. Make sure you have a dedicated IT person or team to fix software and hardware bugs, so your staff don’t waste valuable time trying to work things out.

Consider noise levels
If ten employees are on the telephone, ten phones are ringing off the hook and ten people are trying to have a meeting, is this a productive workspace or pure chaos? Consider separate meeting areas, soundproofing ceiling tiles and using fabric screens to offer privacy to those who need it. Glass walls may be the solution for your accounts team or anyone else who may require a quiet environment to reduce distractions and improve concentration.

Make light and airy spaces
Make sure your staff have access to fresh air and natural light. This will reduce fatigue, eye strain, the spread of viral infections, headaches caused by artificial lighting and absenteeism. Introduce plants for better air quality.

Movement breaks
Ask your staff to relocate some of the items they use often. This will force them to get up from their workspace frequently and move around. Sitting or standing in one position for prolonged periods can have a negative impact on both physical and mental health. Simply moving around will rejuvenate fatigued workers.

Ergonomics
Speak to your facilities management department about reducing the risk of musculoskeletal injuries in the workplace. Some of the usual methods are as follows:
-       Wrist supports for use with mouse and keyboard
-       Screen/monitor supports for posture
-       Footrests for comfort and blood flow
-       Replace telephone handsets with headsets
-       Ergonomic seating to encourage an improved sitting position and posture

Feeling happy and contented at work is contagious, and these simple steps could have a significant impact on your working environment, resulting in higher productivity and more satisfied staff.


woman working on a laptop at desk

Sitting too much at work is damaging office employees' health

Whilst countless studies have been undertaken to highlight the dangers of sitting for long periods of time at work, very little attention has been dedicated to studying prolonged standing and the serious health risks involved.

A recent study by The Institute for Work and Health has discovered that both sitting and standing for long periods of time whilst at work could be a serious health risk.

Whilst most employers and their workers assume health problems are limited to musculoskeletal issues, the study contradicts this. Two separate studies were carried out by postdoctoral fellow, Dr Aviroop Biswas and senior scientist, Dr Peter Smith. They discovered those who are seated at work for prolonged periods are placing themselves at a higher risk of heart disease, diabetes and some cancers, coupled with a higher chance of dying from these serious health conditions.

The chances of suffering from heart disease are 2.2 times higher for those who stand at work than those who sit. The doctors state their independent studies are not, in fact, contradictory, explaining that sitting at work instead of standing is not a better option for you nor vice versa, but that in any event, employees must be encouraged to move around more.

A further study, published in the Occupational Medicine scientific journal, highlights that exercise outside of working hours does nothing to counterbalance health issues for workers. The 343 employees involved in the study were not aware they were still at risk of life-threatening illnesses if they conducted exercise outside of work and they thought that uninterrupted sitting would not cause serious health problems if they were undertaking regular exercise alongside it.

One solution to consider is for your company’s HR and FM departments to collaborate, putting a plan in place to encourage sedentary employees to get up from their desks more and for those who stand at work to take the opportunity to sit down whenever they can. This could mean deciding when your staff take breaks and including standing and moving. If yours is a fun working environment, playing music at set times throughout the day is a way to get your staff to stand up and move around. For those with a more conservative working environment, ‘take a walk’ breaks could be introduced.

In order to interrupt your standing employees, break out areas with comfortable seating may be a beneficial option. If your standing employees are customer facing, consider introducing chairs and inform your customers of the reasons for this and the health implications involved for your standing staff. This is also a great way to raise awareness among the general public.

Your facilities management team should have more creative ideas on how to achieve a more active and healthier working environment. They may be able to introduce more innovative desk and working area designs and technologies that allow employees to work standing up in a different location within the office at certain times of the working day.

In conclusion, being sedentary in the workplace, whether standing or seated, is bad for your health. As companies introduce more flexible ways of working, we may start to see a reduction in the adverse health effects of prolonged sitting and standing in the workplace.


How to keep a sustainable building green text over image

How to keep a sustainable building green!

You may think that by operating in a sustainable building, your business has met its obligations in terms of helping to create a greener environment and that you can sit back and let the building operations in a sustainable way.

This is not the case. A sustainable building and business will require continuous attention to ensure it remains sustainable today, tomorrow and into the future.

Constructing or renovating a building to obtain the green building certificate Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) is the first phase of becoming an environmentally friendly business. The next phase will require the monitoring of the business to ensure it continues to meet such standards.

This could entail monitoring waste levels to ensure it remains below a previously specified level. However, previously set targets can also be improved upon. The continuous monitoring of waste could help to identify areas where changes could be made that could increase recycling, which would decrease landfill waste and in turn lead to cost-savings, meaning both the business and the environment would come out as winners.

By monitoring and attempting to increase the company’s use of recyclable materials, more of the company’s waste could be found to be suitable for recycling.

From the outset, the business will need to identify how best to measure its operations, which would become a baseline and help to flag up any problems in maintaining its sustainability levels. It would also help to measure the success of any changes that are made with a view to improving the company’s sustainability.

A facilities manager (FM), who may be in charge of one building or multiple buildings, will need to deploy software to monitor the performance of operations in various locations. Some companies provide benchmark tools which can be utilised to measure the consumption of water, energy and greenhouse gas emissions from a single facility or a group of buildings.

This can be useful in determining whether there are some aspects of a company’s operations that need more attention, in terms of meeting sustainability targets, than others. This will allow the company to place its resources and attention where it is needed the most.

Some software companies monitor consumption levels and deliver the results on a 12-month average basis, while other companies can measure the performance of a company’s sustainability credentials on a day-to-day basis, which could help the business keep on top of issues as they arise and allow it to more easily pinpoint areas that need extra attention.

As well as using the latest software to help your business maintain its environmentally-friendly operations, a physical inspection of the facilities is crucial. Night audits are particularly useful. A simple walk through an empty building could identify machinery and equipment that continues to run overnight.

FM staff could then highlight areas of concern and review whether such equipment needs to run overnight or during the company’s downtime. By adjusting processes to reduce the amount of equipment that continues to run when a building is empty, efficiency could be increased by up to 20%.


People running up a trend arrow

Every FM manager should know these trends

There are a number of trends set to change the FM and services industry. By identifying changes that will impact the sector, managers can plan for, and even benefit from, future shifts in society and in how we do business.

Economic Growth
The shift in economic growth from the west to emerging markets in the east means industry players must do more to set themselves apart in what will become a crowded market with new competition. Multinational companies should ensure their products can be tailored to a variety of local markets, so they can capitalise on growth in areas with differing cultures.

Commercialisation
Trends in commercialisation will lead to greater competition and innovation, with industry players needing to ensure their customers stay relevant. It will be essential that managers understand key business indicators and how they can help customers achieve optimised performance. Two examples of this would be to use lean management techniques that cut needless processes or the data-driven six sigma method, which seeks to enhance customer satisfaction with continuous process improvements and low defect rates.

Ageing Population
An ageing population coupled with diminishing pension incomes are leading to an increasing number of people working until later in life, which is changing the workplace. When it comes to hiring and retaining staff, the FM industry will need to gain an understanding of the motivation that drives its staff, which will differ widely from generation to generation.

Furthermore, with a four-generation workforce set to become commonplace in European, American, Japanese and Chinese workplaces, recruiters will need to recognise the differences between these generations, along with the challenges and opportunities that this trend will present.

Technological Progression
Advances in technology, including smart security, robotics and sensors, will affect jobs, leading to reduced demand for low-skilled workers, while increasing demand for skilled staff.

Climate Change
Climate change will force most industries and societies to become greener, which could impact on supply chains and the design, maintenance and management of buildings in the future. However, climate change and the urbanisation of mid to low-income countries in regions prone to natural disasters will bring new risk to the industry, which must ensure it is adequately prepared for such an event. This could be by having robust contingency and continuity plans in place.

Health
Meanwhile, the growing focus on human health will lead to the redesign of buildings to encourage staff to be more active and to stave off lifestyle-related diseases such as diabetes. This trend is notable for the industry, as almost a third of Europe’s FM revenue comes from the healthcare sector, but budget cuts could result in governments outsourcing more work.

Flexibility At Work
Lastly, the traditional workplace is changing, with companies of all sizes shifting to models that promote flexible, collaborative, innovative and productive work. This is demonstrated by the growth of coworking environments, homeworking and flexible working options that have become common across the world.

This trend can be used to help retain and recruit staff. A company can be more appealing for prospective workers by offering flexible working options. Flexible working will require managers to use online facility booking and management tools.

Trends that could impact the industry are wide-ranging, but the common factor here is preparedness, which could make the difference between success and failure.


blurred retail store

Why digital transformation is now coming to retail FM

The death of high street retail is probably somewhat exaggerated, but its transformation is happening now - and FM leaders need to be at the forefront of this change. 

"Legacy" FM is a set of attitudes to facilities management, firmly entrenched in the past, and making no effort to recognise today's digital revolution, which is changing retail FM rapidly and forever. Legacy FM consists of keeping old facilities in their traditional configuration, and ignoring or refusing requests to adapt the space to changing consumer demand. If systems need replacing, the cheapest option is always adopted, but in general, change is seen as something to be avoided at all costs.

The cost will always be important, but so is the investment, because retail business success requires spaces that consumers can relate to, and will make a point of visiting. Innovative companies that see a different future for retail are prepared to make this type of investment, but when it comes to recruitment, they need FM professionals who can match their vision.

FM companies will increasingly be partners to these game-changing companies, providing flexible and exciting locations that engage the customer. Tracking sensors, electronic in-store messaging, interactive kiosks and mixes of real-life experience with software provision are all going to be needed.

The new FM mindset is more flexible about building systems, too. Previously, systems were rigid entities that were difficult and expensive to change, without replacing the entire infrastructure. These days, with modular and intelligent building systems, parts of the system can be swapped in or out - provided the FM professional understands this new approach.

But perhaps the major challenge going forward is going to be integration with digital systems. In retail, the challenge from online will be met head-on by providing the same services as an online store, but adding value to them. Sure, you can buy your new drill online, but only when you order or buy in-store will you get the tutorial from a professional showing you how to use it. People won't want to carry lots of stuff home - but they will want it delivered later that day. So logistics systems will have to be integrated with store systems, and in some cases, delivery vans will need to be located nearby, for immediate pickup and distribution.

Another of the key changes in retail will be the integration of entertainment and eating into the retail environment. Some branches of Next already contain Costa coffee shops within the store. Large malls such as Westfield have cinemas, live music and other forms of entertainment, as well as a huge choice of restaurants, diners and cafes, and even spa and wellness areas. All of this calls for facilities management that is able to cross boundaries and service very different kinds of activities. New FM systems also integrate advanced security and monitoring systems, to ensure that the retail space is safe for both customers and employees.

The simpler, self-contained legacy systems of the past didn't have to deal with this kind of complexity. But the FM jobs of the future will go to those FM managers who can thrive in these kinds of multi-functional retail spaces.


young female worker holding glasses

How younger workers are reshaping the FM industry

Commentators are beginning to divide younger people into two distinct groups. There are the "millennials" that we hear about all the time. This is the generation that grew up with IT at school and then took to the internet in droves. Their working life has always involved the use of technology. But there's an even younger group, called Generation Z - the smartphone generation. They expect all of their interactions to be available via a phone and the phone dominates their use of media and their internet interactions.

As baby boomers reach the end of their working lives and retire, the recruitment demand for skilled employees (including FM professionals, of course), is soaring. But companies looking to recruit Millennials and Generation Z are going to have to provide the kind of workspaces that these new employees want, to attract the right kind of talent. What does this mean for facilities management companies?

Engage, inform and involve

One of the key differences with the new workers is that they expect to be engaged, informed and involved. The FM industry has sometimes had a "command and control" attitude, where pragmatism was the key virtue, and carrying out instructions without questioning them was the norm. This isn't going to wash with Generation Z. They will want to know the reasons that things are being done in the way they are.

They won't automatically respect greater knowledge either. After all, in the age of the Youtube video telling you how to do practically everything, knowing stuff doesn't have the cachet that it used to. Instead, they'll respect how FM managers apply that knowledge.

This is particularly true when it comes to values. In the past, FM professionals weren't expected to have a set of guiding principles. With the rise of concern for the environment, facilities management is far more political than it was in the past. Generation Z is going to want work that is meaningful, and not in contradiction with its values and beliefs.

How to recruit the best

Mobile phone technology is second nature to "Zs", and with the increasing use of voice technology, its place in FM should be assured. So if Zs go for an interview with a company that has paper-based or PC-only systems, they're going to feel that they're entering the Dark Ages.

It's surprising how much potential candidates can glean about a company's attitude to technology simply from the recruitment process. A paper letter, with a map and directions for an interview, tells the potential recruit that the company is unlikely to be involved in anything innovative. Clunky email attachments aren't much better. These people will be setting out for their interview with a phone, so companies need to make sure that their profile and methods are completely mobile-friendly.

And importantly, even when Zs are starting at the bottom, they want their contribution to be recognised. So as well as recognising teamwork, managers skilled at recruiting and engaging this age group make a point of recognising their individual contribution too.


magnifying glass in the centre of wooden people

Are you ready for these new recruitment trends?

As the world of work changes, so does the way in which employers recruit. Some changes may not stand the test of time, but the following just might.

Mobile-first indexing

A Google initiative designed to enhance our experience as online searchers and to ensure that Google keeps up with our habits. Google likes the fact that we say we will “Google” something and it wants to keep on our good side. Nowadays, more and more of us are looking for jobs on our smartphones and tablets, but some recruiters still don’t acknowledge this. This move is intended to change that.

No more written CVs?

Increasingly, recruiters, whether in-house or external, are placing their focus on more than just what we write in our CV. What do our social media profiles say about us? Do they portray us in a way that we’d like a current or prospective employer to see us? Employees may need to start doing the same sort of things that businesses need to do, creating their own personal websites and building a suitable 'brand' for their chosen career in order to get hired.

Make the company profile look the part

We may not have got to the recruitment equivalent of online dating sites as yet, but we do need people to “fit,” if we want the hire to be successful on both sides. The way we do this is to be honest yet attractive. To use a phrase that was very common back in the early 2000s, we need to make ourselves, “employers of choice.” We need to do this on our website as well as our social media profile pages and we mustn't forget all those job review sites either.

AI anyone?

Like it or not, artificial intelligence is not going away. It’s already in use in one form or another in the UK, in the NHS, for example, and in a number of industries. This is starting to impact on the types of job available, with analysts suggesting that it will create many more new roles than it will replace. It is also having a significant effect on the efficiency of candidate screening and accuracy of hire in the recruitment sector.

Flexible working

More and more of us are moving into freelance or self-employed roles. It’s beneficial for the employer because their costs are lower and beneficial for the worker because they have greater flexibility over their working hours and locations. There are plusses and minuses on both sides but focus on the positives.

Virtual Reality

Not only software for video interviews, but VR and augmented reality are now being used in recruitment. They enable candidates to take part in simulations of real-life situations.

Talent Relationship Management (TRM)

This is becoming more important in recruitment, but we shouldn’t forget our existing talent. There are many reasons to promote internally-developed people, however, we don’t want to forget potential new talent either.

The truth is, we need to use a wide variety of recruitment methods in order to hire the right people. We stand a better chance of getting the right people by staying ahead of the curve.