Next steps following an FM interview

Next steps following an FM interview

Next steps following an FM interview

Did you know that what you do after an interview could impact on whether you get the job? If you've ever wondered whether you should follow up on an interview with an email or call, then you may be interested in making the most of the post-interview period.

If you want to reinforce the professional impression you gave at your interview or to elevate your chances of success by keeping your name fresh in the interviewer's mind, these are the steps you need to take for the best chance of success.

Ask for contact information

When you're job hunting in FM and you land that interview, don't leave without asking for contact information and next steps. Ask how long it typically takes for the company to make a decision, or whether there'll be a second interview.

Assess your performance

This is critical to help in future interviews. Write up how the interview went, including how you answered the questions, the things you wish you'd said, and important names, insights and questions. This will help you improve your performance in future and mean that you're well prepared for that second interview.

Send a note soon after the interview

Sending a thank-you note within 24 hours of your interview should be top of your to-do list. It may be more appropriate to send a handwritten note. If not, send an email and take the opportunity to add a link to something relevant or current in facilities management. Make it relevant to the content of your interview so it adds value to your thanks.

Send supporting documents

If you've been asked to submit supporting documents, make sure you do it as soon as possible. Whether you need to submit consent forms, references or a written assessment, sending your documentation in a timely manner is another top priority.

Contact your references

It's good practice to let your professional references know that you've been for an interview and that they may be contacted. In fact, you should only submit references if you have that person's consent.

Connect on social media

If you use sites like LinkedIn, try connecting with your interviewer post-interview. If they accept your request it could be a signal that they're interested in hearing more from you. Even if this turns out not to be the right FM position for you and you end up working for a different company, it's a useful way to expand your personal network. That in turn means you'll be ideally placed to make the most of future FM opportunities.

Use your waiting time wisely

While you're waiting to hear back about the results of your interview, there are plenty of things you can do to increase your chances of future success. Brush up on new skills to add to your CV or make connections with people you may know working for the hiring company who can give you some valuable insights. Stay calm, and follow up as per the hirer's instructions. For example, if they ask for an email follow up within the week, don't call two weeks later.

If you're job hunting in FM, we're the facilities management recruitment agency you can trust. At Catch 22 we have an enviable reputation in the FM sector so why not contact us for your next FM job today?


interviews online on a computer

Top questions to ask candidates in interviews!

Top questions to ask candidates in interviews! Did you know the cost of a bad hire can run into six figures? Finding the right talent for that facilities management job is all about asking the right questions. Questions that let you evaluate whether a candidate is the right fit for your company’s goals and culture.

To get a good all-round picture of how a candidate can fit your company culture, try asking these questions in your next round of interviews:

What skill would you like to improve and how?

The ‘what’s your biggest weakness?’ question might be a classic interview technique, but it’s a cliche and a trap for potential hires. Turn the tables and ask them to focus on areas for improvement that won’t potentially sink their interview chances.

This question also tests self-awareness and gives candidates the opportunity to demonstrate professional growth. It also lets you find out fast whether their shortcomings would stop them from being a success in the role.

Can you tell me about a work-related challenge where you used your own initiative?

The way a candidate answers this question can tell you how they respond to stress and pressure and how they problem-solve. But it can also tell you whether they’re prepared to go above and beyond in a crisis situation or do the bare minimum.

This is a straightforward competency question but the best candidates will tell you not only what they did, but the positive effect it had on the company.

What are your long-term career goals?

You’re looking for a candidate with career goals that align with your company goals and values. If you sense that their goals can’t be achieved by working for you then they may not be a good fit.

You need to know why a potential hire wants to work for you. Why? Because you need them to be motivated to do great work and be in it for the long haul. Asking these types of career goals questions should find out the candidates who are prepared to give a well thought out and honest answer, and make a great fit with your company culture.

How would you describe your work style and your ideal working environment?

You may not want a team of cookie-cutter employees but if things are working well you don’t want to throw a spanner in the works. If your candidate is an independent worker who prefers a quiet, heads down environment, they’re not going to fit your highly collaborative, high energy team.

These types of question in interviews give invaluable insights into whether a candidate is a good fit for your existing team and your company culture and environment as a whole.

Every CV has one lie on it, what’s yours?

A curveball question not only keeps candidates on their toes can be a good test of character. It doesn’t have to be about their CV - it could be about their favourite Doctor Who or how many Smarties fit in a backpack. The point is that creative curveball questions are one of the best ways to identify people with the right talents for the job.

The interview process can help you find those great hires that fit your company perfectly. At Catch 22 recruitment agency we find the best FM candidates for your full and part-time vacancies for a service you can trust. Find out more about our recruitment process here: https://www.c22.co.uk/employers/


Interview

4 Top Tips for Acing Your Second Interview

The second interview – congratulations, you've impressed the hiring managers and made it through the first stage. You are now one step closer to securing your dream Facilities Management job.

But what makes the second interview, different from the first? And, more importantly, how should you prepare to make sure you get it right? It’s often a mistake made even by senior candidates that the research and preparation are all about the first interview. But the second interview is even more important. Don't think that just because you've been invited back that you don't have to prepare as well as you fit for the first.

Whilst the first interview usually just covers the important basics, the second interview will really get under the skin. The interviewer is trying to determine if you are the right person not only to do the job but to add value to the company too. Will you be there in 3-5 years time? What will your role be and what skills can you bring with you along the way.

So here’s everything you need to know...

The Second Interview – Use what you learnt in the first interview

“So, since our last meeting, what thoughts have you had about the job and the company?”. It's such an important question to make sure you are prepared for!  It isn’t designed to trip you up, but being underprepared will leave you waffling. Be confident in your response. It’s OK to take in notes. Things to include are your main reasons you want this job, why the company is the right fit for you, their vision etc.  This not only proves you have thought about it seriously but that you have listened and retained information - a good skill to have! But, and this is where you can really stand out. Think about why the company should want you!  Perfect your elevator pitch!

Refer back to things that were discussed in the first interview.  What were the key things you noticed that were important to the company? Bring them up in conversation and then use examples to show you share the same values. Do they have a certain culture?  Have you worked in that culture before? Can you demonstrate your success? Just remember to keep showing that you are the right person for the job.

successful interview

Address anything you missed in the first interview

The second interview is also an opportunity to say things you forgot to say in the first interview.  Or, ask things you forgot to ask.  Make the most of this chance to shine!  Become the front runner!  Was there something that you feel you didn’t answer right the first time?  Or, maybe not to your best ability.  We know that interviews can make some people flustered, or nervous.  Especially if it's your first one for a while.  Don't be afraid to discuss this in the interview.  It could make all the difference to the outcome rather than not wanting to reminder the hiring managers.  This time around, you should be more confident than the first time.  But, remember not to be overly confident – you haven’t got the job yet!  But at least you know that you are a potential hire.  Now it's down to you.

 

Get to know who you're meeting

Researching people before an interview is now fairly simple. A quick LinkedIn search will tell you about the career history of who you are meeting. Whilst this is great as first interview preparation, you can take it a step further on the second interview. Take a look at what pages they follow on LinkedIn, their education or skills. This can tell you a lot about a person and also if you have anything in common. Maybe it’s a sport, a good cause, or simply an approach to business. People like to hire people that share their values. Any chance you get to demonstrate this - take it! There are other things you can do to find common interests too. Do the company sponsor a charity? Maybe you have raised money for a charity before. Or, maybe the charity is of particular interest to you. If a hiring manager really can’t decide between two excellent candidates, a shared value could really tip the balance in your favour.

 

Saying thank you after the second interview

It's not over after you have finished the second interview. Sending a short message of thanks to the hiring manager will go a long way - don't forget to thank your recruiter too!  Sending a thank-you email may seem so obvious to so many people, but we are always surprised by how few people actually do. It doesn’t have to be a long message. Just express your thanks and your genuine interest in the role. Thank them for taking the time to meet with you again.

If you are looking for work within Facilities Management, get in touch with our expert team today.